10.17.2011 08:18 AM

Tim Hudak is heard from

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As far as I am aware, this is the first direct communication – a tweet or otherwise – from the PC leader since he lost the election.

I don’t know about you, but I find this kind of amazing. This is the first thing he has to say to voters?

Like I said once before: as a TSN anchor, he’d be great.

As a leader of a political party? Not so much.

24 Comments

  1. James Bow says:

    Election?! What election? That wasn’t an election! That was… that was just a practise run for my ascension in 2015! Yeah! Ditch the taxman!!!

    😉

  2. Bil Huk says:

    As a giants fan, i agree, it was a great game to watch. 🙂

  3. frmr disgruntled Con now happy Lib says:

    Who said a sustainable economy was going to be cheap, Mr. Tulk?…….Id like to think by acting now, Mr. McGuinty is helping to ensure there is a viable planet for your grandchildren……

    Now go tilt at some other windmills…..

    • Pete says:

      Gord, You miss an important point in all this. When Suncor first developed their tar sands process BACK IN THE 1960’S they lost money for years (as did Syncrude) until (A) they modified their operations and became more efficient (B) they continued to develop extraction methods that were more efficient and cost effective and yes even cleaner (C) the rising price of oil made them even more competitive. Now there are even more effficient and cleaner methods for extraction and upgrading of the bitumen but the cost per barrel is not going down at all. China alone will soon absorb well over 10MM Barrels per day and growing from 3MM just 10 years ago. India is next on the growth of oil in their economy.

      This will also happen to wind power. Better and more efficient rotors/turbines and lower cost construction will all happen sooner than later and energy prices will rise up to meet the costs of wind farm operators. Experience is a teacher.
      Energy is not going to get cheaper no matter how much oil there is in Alberta and I am a big fan of the tar sands because I see the ultimate good it does for us all. Renewable resources will also be a big part of the picture.

    • pomojen says:

      Windmills are seen now as “quaint follies?” They’ve been around for at least a couple thousand years. There were around 10,000 of them working their gears off in the Netherlands in the mid 19c. They might have been replaced by steam and fossil fuels since then, but I think it’s a bit much to call them a charming mistake. They were pretty handy – dare I say critically important – back in the day. I don’t consider that a quaint folly. I consider that a product of human ingenuity that worked for a very long time. Alchemy…Phrenology…Mustard Poultices…those are quaint follies. Not windmills.

      Besides. Let’s say turbines have a shelf-life as ideas go for about as long as the 8-track did. Your great great grandchildren may indeed see them as clunky and inefficient monstrosities but my guess is they will see this era’s burning of fossil fuels as reckless, irresponsible and tragic. I’m Ok with turbines. They are the manifestation of our growing desire and determination to get off the oil. They are not perfect. They are not the end product either.

      • The Doctor says:

        You’re a little bit off there about windmills — I agree they were all over the place in the Netherlands, but they weren’t a source of energy per se, in the sense that they weren’t creating energy that could be transferred or transported off-site, they weren’t powering vehicles or lighting or heating homes or anything like that. They were doing pure mechanical work on-site, such as grinding up grain. And their primary use was simply moving water — they were the primary means by which the Dutch drained swamps and marshes and reclaimed land. Really they were like giant shovels or scoops in that respect. The windmill would power a giant scoop at the bottom that picked up water and lifted it a metre or two to a holding pond. Then another windmill further down did the same thing, and so on.

  4. Michael Reintjes says:

    I thought the Bills were gonna pull it out…Oh wel..

  5. Ted H says:

    I don’t think Mr. Hudak would want to bring attention to this particular issue and thus highlight the fact that he has no workable policy.

  6. Shaun says:

    Oh, look, Gord is citing some elite professor from the ivory tower. Maybe Prof. Glenn Fox should get a ‘real’ job, don’t you think? Maybe something dignified like insurance sales?

    If you’re right about an Ontario election being only months away, I’ll introduce you to my grandmother so you can sell her some useless insurance product she doesn’t need — maybe some term life?

    • Chris says:

      Does it strike anybody else as odd that Gord was virtually invisible during the election campaign, but now that it’s over he’s posting up a storm again?

      What’s the angle? I don’t get it.

  7. Andrew says:

    Did something happen while I was asleep? Oh, right…Liberal, Conservative thing…

  8. Just call me Rick says:

    Prof. Fox writes for the Fraser institute. http://www.fraserinstitute.org/author.aspx?id=14775&txID=2677. ‘Nuff said.

  9. pedro says:

    I’m just new to Twitter myself, but it seems that old Timmy has in fact been fairly active since the election Warren! See tweets from 7, 14 and 15 October, http://twitter.com/#!/timhudak.

    Just sayin’.

  10. kre8tv says:

    I thought maybe he’d been so quiet because he was on a Blackberry.

  11. Lipman says:

    I wonder if he’s going to continue calling the Premier: “Dallmuginny” in perpetual opposition

  12. TheSilentObserver says:

    The PCs would be stupid to keep Hudak on until the next election. He incresed seats ~50%, sure, but there is no way he can take the province with the deeply bigoted cabal he has erected in the party running the show. I was a little struck when he said on election night that he was proud of his campaign, there is nothing to be proud about in regards to race-baiting, homophobia, desecrating the environment and killing jobs Mr. Hudak. If anything, this means that he is unable to learn from his mistakes and thus can’t improve his party. The attempts from the PCs to downplay their defeat ignores just how well they were polling for the better part of 10-11 and just how ugly and personal the feelings from the PC base have become towards McGuinty.

  13. Andrew says:

    Mr. Tulk: Regarding your comment from yesterday that the oil industry developed the oil sand technology being used today. That is not entirely correct. The SAGD technology that is currently being used in the Oil Sands (CVE, DEV, MEG, SU, CLL, JACOS, COP, NXY) was mostly funded by Government of Alberta. Industry wasn’t interested at the time (early 80’s when WTI was in the crapper) so Peter Lougheed threw a Hail Mary, won the game and opened up the Athabasca Oil Sands to in situ development. That is a great example of how governments can be game changers in a positive way. Also remember that CVE started out as a Crown Corporation (Alberta Energy Company) and given the various bombing ranges as their base resource.

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