09.26.2015 10:37 AM

KCCCC Day 55: Saturday morning bits and pieces

  • Good morning from cold and wet Whitehorse! We have some big things on the agenda today – among them a potlatch out in Carcross – so here’s some bits and pieces about this and that.
  • Grumpy Justin: Is this story true? Well, some might say: consider the source(s). But I’ve had dealings with Suzuki and Solomon in the past, and so I tend to believe what they’re claiming.
  • Don’t talk about how you makes sausages! Election process stories are bad enough – but cocky staffers claiming credit for digging up sleaze on an opponent? Dumb, dumb, dumb. Do your job, do it well, then hand over the results to a reporter and let them claim credit – not you. Don’t do what this anonymous staffer did. Dumb.
  • “They could be talking.” Or, they could not be. And won’t be. And shouldn’t be. Is this being written because these women are talking to each other? Because they’re women? Because…why? From my perch, Messrs. Mulcair and Trudeau energetically detest each other. They see the other guy as their main problem, not Harper. If they haven’t come together before the election, it’s usually pretty damn hard to do so after the election.
  • A Mulcair minority? He’s telling the truth here. He is preparing for transition. To wit, I know of two senior folks who have been approached about working for a Mulcair administration. Problem: looks cocky. Looks arrogant. Looks presumptuous. If you believe Greg, here, that ship has sailed.
  • Anyway, that’s that. Off to the wilds of the Yukon. And, in that regard, a movie poster that reminded me of both the Yukon and the election!

44 Comments

  1. Joe says:

    Well at last I have found something about which I agree with Trudeau and Suzuki. I agree with Suzuki that Trudeau is a twerp and I agree with Trudeau that Suzuki’s plan is crap. Its a win win!

  2. Protocol Police says:

    It would be a “Mulcair government”. Not “Mulcair administration”. Administrations are for Presidents. Governments are for Prime Ministers.

  3. Justin says:

    I like Trudeau even more now!

  4. Mike says:

    LOL…….Rat mucking…..the G rated version.

  5. Kaiser Helmets 'n Motorbikes says:

    Maybe your boy isn’t so bad after all. Two things about Justin Trudeau that Cons should know before writing this guy off as a debutante:

    1. His grandfather, James Sinclair, Margaret’s father, was one of the legendary RAF fighter pilots who fought the battle of Malta in 1942. Many, if not most, of these RAF fighter pilots were in fact Canadian RCAF fighter pilots sent to RAF squadrons after the battle of Britain. Their contributions to Canada’s military history is often overlooked as they were completely integrated into RAF squadrons.

    The squadrons were vastly outnumbered, the island fortress was cut off from supplies, and it was, at the time, the most bombed piece of real estate in history. Somehow Justin’s grandfather, and a very small number of mostly Canadian kids, turned back the entire Italian Air Force, and held off the might off powerful Luftwaffe. Canada’s great WW2 ace, the enigmatic “Falcon of Malta”, Buss Beurling, may the most famous, but men like Justin’s grandfather deserve the title of hero as well.

    2. He just told Saint Suzuki to “stick it”! Wow, this guy just might have a set after all. If Justin can show a bit of independence and leadership in the next four weeks, I and many, many other Cons will give him a serious second look.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/david-suzuki-says-justin-trudeau-called-his-views-on-climate-change-sanctimonious-crap-in-heated-phone-call

    • Matt says:

      1) Who is grandfather was has jack shit to do with Trudeau. By your logic Kiefer Sutherland would be a great PM because his grandfather was Tommy Douglas. Besides, what would Trudeau’s fighter pilot grandfather think of his grandson’s smartass remark about whipping out our C-F18’s and his willingness to run away in the face of threats like ISIS pose to the world?

      2) Suzuki is a fraud for sure. He’s also the darling of the left. The same left Trudeau is trying to win over. They may not take to kindly to Trudeau talking to Saint Suzuki like that.

    • Bill MacLeod says:

      Yes, and furthermore, he may not be the tax-the-rich, bloat-the-civil-service kind of guy every progressive thinks he is:

      OTTAWA — The federal Liberals say they can add almost $146.5 billion in new government spending over the next four years, and still bring the budget back to balance with a surplus of about $1 billion by the end of a four-year mandate.

      To get there, they say, a Liberal government would seek out billions in savings from eliminating a number of tax breaks, cutting back on government spending and cracking down on tax evasion.

      ***
      So, since cutting tax breaks is unlikely to amount to more than $10-billion a year. Ans since his budgets will have deficits of no more than $30-billion in the four years, that leaves nearly $20-billion per year in reduced government spending.

      Ouch.

    • Vancouverois says:

      1. Who cares who his grandfather was? I think it was already a terrible mistake when the Liberals chose JT because of who his father was.

      2. Though I share everyone’s glee at the idea of JT snubbing Suzuki, it doesn’t sound like it was for the right reasons. It sounds like the Dauphin was just in a snit because Suzuki presumed to lecture him (which is another heart-warming image, actually).

  6. Jack D says:

    With regards to the Suzuki incident, he is a sanctimonious a**hole. There is a canyon of delusion between what Suzuki wants to happen with the environment and what will happen in reality. He has now spent decades preaching to Canadians about the catastrophic consequences of climate change, suggesting that 80% of the natural resources should stay in the oil-sands without explaining as to how Canada could possibly manage the economic repercussions this would have and has the chutzpah to chastise Trudeau is just “fishing for votes” in Alberta. What Suzuki so miserably fails to realize is that a Prime Minister needs to consider all facets of Canadian governance and this includes things such as the environment AND the economy. Ironically, Suzuki is probably doing much more damage to his own cause than good.

    With regards to the “Mulcair minority”, I agree totally with Warren; it is presumptuous and arrogant. The NDP have actually been taking this approach for quite sometime now, seemingly to create a sense of readiness in the minds of voters when considering the NDP. Even the general tone of the NDP campaign has been constructed in a way that, by design, is meant to tell audiences that “we are the government in waiting”. The problem with that, however, is now that the NDP’s lead has largely evaporated and they are failing to consolidate the change-vote, its coming off incredibly insolent. Tom Mulcair and the NDP are playing the front-runner game and by all accounts, they are no longer running in front.

    They are putting the cart before the horse. They’re speaking of preparing for an NDP government like its a god-given right, before they’ve even told the voters why they deserve to be elected to government. The NDP is getting caught up in their own hubris. Its too early to tell whether the ship has sailed as Greg Lyle suggests, but with only a few weeks left to e-day and with the NDP losing ground –they’ve fumbled every opportunity they’ve had thus far to convince voters to join the Tommy-Express.

    • ben burd says:

      It is obvious to me that you would not be voting NDP and therefore everything you say could be taken as negative reinforcement. There is absolutely nothing wrong with, and it is certainly not presumptious, to be talking about how the NDP would govern before the election. After all most of the electorate want to know what the parties are going to do before casting a vote, unless they are like you and have already committed. In that light your comment should not be considered considered!

      • Jack D says:

        I’ve made no illusions of my bias, and its pretty thin of you to point out what was already blatantly obvious. So bravo. Yes, you are correct in saying that I wouldn’t vote NDP. But my political leanings don’t preclude my evaluation from being valid. That’s what you’ve quite visibly failed to understand.

        “After all most of the electorate want to know what the parties are going to do before casting a vote”

        And here you have provided the perfect rebuttal to your own argument. Absolutely –voters want to know what parties will do before they cast their vote for them. Hence, me clearly stating so in my original post. The problem with the NDP though, is that they are failing to do just that. They aren’t telling voters why they should vote for them, their platform lacks coherence of any sort, yet they’ve already begun measuring the drapes in the PMO. As a voter, I would like to know what direction they intend on taking the Canadian government vis-a-vis programs and policies. What the NDP is is doing is showing me their proficient in determining outcomes of elections as opposed to working hard to earn my vote. It’s presumptuous for them to think they are in a position to begin a transition into government when, according to polls, haven’t convinced voters yet they deserve to be in government.

    • Vancouverois says:

      To be fair, it isn’t presumptuous for the NDP to be prepared for a minority, or even a majority — that’s just responsible planning.

      Talking about it public, though, IS presumptuous. And I don’t think it will play all that well. If Mulcair is expecting it to increase support for the NDP, he may well find it does the exact opposite.

      • terence quinn says:

        Its as close as Mulcair will get to actually governing. He will be back in 3rd place on the morning of Oct.20 having won only about 70 seats and around 25% of the vote.

        • Vancouverois says:

          We’ll see. After the massive reversals we’ve seen over the past few elections in… well, everywhere… I wouldn’t presume to predict anything!

      • ben burd says:

        I totally disagree, the electorate want to know all before the vote and this is all, not just good planning. Rather that than after vote surprises a la Libs – Red Book repudiations and wage and price controls and the failure to repeal free trade and the GST, and the Cons hidden agenda.

        • Vancouverois says:

          The electorate doesn’t want to know “everything”. The electorate is barely paying attention at all.

          The idea that this makes them look more “open” is ridiculous. There’s nothing partisan about the bureaucratic niceties involved; it’s not like there are major policy differences that will let them draw a sharp and principled contrast with their opponents. It’s all administrative.

          I imagine that Mulcair and his strategists thought this would win votes by making people see that they’re serious about becoming the government. However, that strikes me as a miscalculation. They started this campaign in the lead; everyone has been taking them as a serious contender for several months, ever since C-51 and the NDP triumph in Alberta. I don’t see whose votes they hope to gain.

          By advertising their preparations — something which should be taking place quietly, behind the scenes, without comment — the NDP makes itself look arrogant. And voters don’t like it when politicians display arrogance.

      • Jack D says:

        That is exactly what is taking place, though.

        The only reason we are now aware of the NDP’s transition planning is because they’ve made it public knowledge themselves. It’s party of their strategy to foster a perception of readiness.

        You’re right, this might not play the way Mulcair is expecting it to amongst voters especially since it seems as if the NDP has jumped the gun.

  7. cassandra says:

    suzuki should just stay out of politics, he always mucks stuff up. The reality is, whatever leader gets in, should be held accountable for climate change. But meh not a word about it, instead we have an australian fixer manage to make the focal pt of the election, the niuab.
    politics is a grimy business, is it a wonder that most higher ups have a degree in sleaze:P
    we need to find a way to run the country without politicians,lol

  8. Joe says:

    On a more serious note, I had a great uncle who struck it rich during the Klondike gold rush. He then went farming in Alberta and lost it all. There was an old timer whose hobby it was to memorize Robert Services poems. Every Remembrance Day at the legion he would stand and recite one or two to thunderous applause.

  9. Steve T says:

    In all fairness to JT, David Suzuki is a sanctimonious and pious jerk whenever he is challenged by anyone. He does very well when the CBC and other friendly media are fawning over him, but if anyone questions his opinions, he quickly turns into an a-hole.

  10. Al in Cranbrook says:

    I wish to hell this one hour interview with Suzuki with ABC in Australia would get broadcast in Canada!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hKdmQMVJ70

    There were scientists in the audience that clearly were shocked, indeed gobsmacked. by just what a phony the guy is! I can’t stand the sanctimonious jerk, and even I found myself getting embarrassed for him.

    Watch it, it’s very, very illuminating!!!

    • ian turnbull says:

      Wow. Just a complete idiot. 5 minutes into it, the scientists in the audience realized the guy understood nothing about the topic and didn’t know how to carry on the questioning. It could have been a South Park episode. This should be mandatory viewing for all high school students across Canada.

  11. Ronald O'Dowd says:

    Warren,

    Reading these comments, one should tell Suzuki that he’s been drafted as a candidate in this election campaign…

  12. aggo says:

    Glad to see more people (including JT) have gotten wise to David Suzuki’s BS.

  13. The Observer says:

    A few observations about the polls:
    – they have largely been of “registered voters”
    – almost half (40%) don’t vote
    – the largest demographic of non- voters are 18-30 yr olds.
    – 18-30 yr olds overwhelmingly lean left
    – given the above the polls (until they convert to likely voter models…I suspect to occur prior to election to preserve credibility which outweighs the “horse race” exciting story line) are significantly over counting Liberal and NDP votes

    The recent BC only poll raised this in their favourable CPC predictions. All polling companies and most pundits know dynamic but are largely boycotting it.

    • Nicole says:

      You are assuming that 18 to 30 year olds even bother to respond to a poll, which is highly unlikely. With cell phones that show when an unknown number is calling, most people, much less 18 to 30 year olds, don’t bother to answer that call.
      There is a huge group of “people who don’t bother responding to pollsters” that is never accounted for.

    • Domenico says:

      The assumption that an 18-30 year would respond to a poll request on their cellphone and then not vote is confusing. One would think that those interested enough to respond to a poll would presumably vote. In any case I find polling the most interesting thing in this election so far. Well that and Cranbrook Al’s page long conversations with himself.

  14. Al in Cranbrook says:

    With his permission, copy in some of an email from my son-in-law in Alberta, sums up a lot of this campaign…

    [I]Putting up signs in town today. I go to this one lady’s house as per the list. Turns out the person on the list isn’t the person that lives there anymore. This nice older guy says quietly, “She moved to the country – but heck I will take a sign.” He stands there as I am hammering away and then exclaims out of nowhere – “You know, there are just too many CRAZY IDIOTS out there! What is going on? What is happening to our country?” I kind of just validated him, but that is all he said and then he shook my hand and thanked me and we parted ways. Pretty much sums it up – a lot of quiet conservatives are waking up to the very real threat of entitlement and the left’s tunnel vision.[/I]

    [I]The dipper candidate and the dipper supporters at that forum on Tuesday were all about themselves – my right to be a dick, my right to a job, my right to this, my right to that, what is the government going to give me, what is the government going to do for me – meh meh. Then they have the balls to call Conservatives selfish, ignorant and greedy while making condescending remarks. Absolutely gross.[/I]

    [I]It is disheartening that so many Canadians are like this. It is like they have forgotten how our country was built. However I was encouraged by young and old Conservatives alike today – they are out there and they are the majority.[/I]

    I can’t add anything to this, except that I’m pretty proud of my kids for getting involved.

    • Al in Cranbrook says:

      …so much for the attempted italics.

    • Al in Cranbrook says:

      Thinking about this: The old timer asks, “What is happening to our country?”

      That’s what’s becoming the core issue of this election: What is happening to our country? This sentiment underscores the issue of niqabs…and criminal justice, and work ethic, and entrepreneurship, and personal responsibility, and not least, tradition and heritage. IOW, what being “Canadian” means to so many people, particularly those whom have spent a lifetime working at it.

      Here’s yet another example…

      http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canada-revokes-citizenship-of-toronto-18-ringleader

      We let these people into our country, they swear the oath of allegiance to Canada. For whatever reason – and nobody cares one iota what the reasons may be – they turn on us. They are charged, tried, convicted, and sent to prison for the crime of conspiracy to commit heinous violence against Canadians. As Jason Kenny puts so eloquently, by their own volition they have ceded their Canadian citizenship. One would be exceedingly hard pressed to find 2 people in 10 whom would disagree.

      Nevertheless, both Mulcair and Trudeau immediately jump to and vow to repeal the law that provides for revocation of citizenship to immigrants whom betray, by the most dastardly means conceivable, Canada.

      Here’s the thing about this: It almost certainly will go to the Supreme Court, and a betting man would cast his lot for the law being struck down. And thus, such people, with no real stake whatsoever, historically, culturally, or traditionally in Canada, will be set free back on to the streets of a nation they have deliberately plotted to violently undermine.

      And – yet again – a great many Canadians will ask, quietly or aloud, “WTF is happening to my country???”

      People are getting more than a little tired of asking this question – and being told, for all intents and purposes, to STFU.

      …by all the usual suspects.

    • Scott says:

      That’s the problem with hard core right wingers like you Al. Self delusion. There are no more than 30% Cons in this country and even fewer right wing whacko’s like you. I don’t know about anyone else but I read about one in five of your rants and I find even that is becoming extremely tiresome.

      • Al in Cranbrook says:

        Scott…

        You’re next original thought will be your first. Courtesy and respect for our host prevents me from saying what I really think…so use your wildest imagination, and consider it said.

        Have a nice day.

  15. Retiree says:

    Trudeau winning this hands down!

    He was supposed to be basically unable to walk straight, unable to talk, and to be a complete dunce.

    He ain’t and he’s the next PM!

    • Lance says:

      So should it be wildly celebrated that he hopped over a bar laying on the ground? Please.

      • Jack D says:

        But in all fairness, that bar was set there by the Conservatives to begin with.

        Harper has no one else to blame but himself for Trudeau’s seemingly triumphant return from the lower ebbs of the polls. The constant berating and belittling of Justin Trudeau left voters with very low expectations of him. Harper was wise enough to know not to underestimate Trudeau and the Liberals hence the perpetual TV attack ads. But the consequence of that is because the Conservatives over did it on their anti-Trudeau crusade, they ended up allowing Mulcair to cruise by unabated until he ran out of gas and thus giving Trudeau an opportunity to impress voters.

        Personally, I find it amusing that after Mulcair bombed in the first debates, the NDP starting to significantly down play the prowess of the “great prosecutor” that is Mulcair. Also amusing is that Conservatives are now pushing for a “not-so-perfect” and “your-everyday-joe” Stephen Harper.

        So you can berate Trudeau all you want, but at some point you might realize that it only creates a David and Goliath dynamic; and we all know how that ends.

    • Brent Crofts says:

      Maybe, but as of now he’s behind in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. It will be tough (impossible?) for him to win under those conditions. Still 3 weeks, though. For now, I’m sticking with Warren’s prediction of a Harper minority.

    • Maps Onburt says:

      You aren’t supposed to smoke your pot until after he wins.

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