11.04.2015 11:31 AM

Still up in Twitter at this moment

Weird. Awkward. 

  

8 Comments

  1. Ronald O'Dowd says:

    Warren,

    Do not go gentle into that good night.

    Dylan Thomas

  2. Wolfer says:

    There’s still hope that Donald Trump will win the US presidency, come to Canada and tell Justin Trudeau that he’s fired, and Justin will have to canoe all the way back to his native Cuba.

  3. SG says:

    English Harper PM twitter is now down.

    French one still up.

  4. Jack D says:

    Gone now.

    Like a distant, fading memory of a time when Canada’s soul was slowly being eroded away by the hyper-paranoid politics of the Harper era.

    I really didn’t realize how bad Stephen Harper’s brand of politics got for Canada, until today; until he finally wasn’t Prime Minister anymore.

    You can agree with policies and his ideological stance on government, he was suffocating our Canadian sense of political optimism and activism with a very dark and angry style of politics.

    I know it sounds like hyperbole but from listening and talking to people, you’d get the sense that good triumphed over evil or something today. It should never be like that in Canada, no party or PM should be viewed by 2/3 of the Canadian population as being inherently evil. Harper went too far and it was time for him to go. Fairly or unfairly, events that have unfolded since the 19th have almost been a kind of poetic justice.

    Note to politicians: Never overstay your welcome.

    • Scotian says:

      You make an important point here. I’m old enough that I remember when the anger and sense of relief with the departure of Trudeau the elder happened. The same with Mulroney and Chretien/Martin too of course. While I saw much anger and occasional bitterness I NEVER saw anything like the massive widespread sense of that evil had finally been defeated. This is something I’ve only ever seen with the Harper defeat. I mean I knew why I was so hard core opposed to Harper, but I also was a rarity in our culture, a genuine process geek about government who wasn’t actually ideological/partisan in his roots for being so. I knew my perspective was not typical or mainstream for our political/social culture. Yet to see such relief in so many from so many walks of life both social and political, to see such unanimity about the freedom from evil (that election campaign with the xenophobic pandering within it from the Harper CPC really seemed to touch a nerve with a lot of people it seems to me) that the defeat of Harper and a Justin Trudeau majority government creates (another interesting thing, I hear very little grumbling about this being a majority and people wishing it were a minority, unlike the last few election cycles, a point I suspect in the desire to be certain Harper would be gone) I find truly remarkable in the old sense of the word. To be worthy of remarking.

      I’ve never seen anything like this with the exception of how things felt when the Berlin Wall started coming down in 1989 and the end of the Cold War suddenly went from being an abstract hope to actually happening in front of our eyes.

  5. Tim says:

    In a small way I’m glad Harper stayed long enough for Canadians to show him the door. It wouldn’t have felt as good if he had left on his own terms.

  6. Bill Templeman says:

    While I can eagerly join this schandenfreude joyride over Harper’s final exit via a loading dock behind the Conservative caucus meeting that elected Rona Ambrose, let’s not forget that over 5 million Canadians voted for him. Rather than dance on his grave, how about engaging all those Conservatives in real dialogue? “Please explain why you voted Conservative? What was it about their platform that resonated with you?”

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