Proof that the “deleted gas plant email scandal” is bullshit

And from reporters! Reporting on sworn testimony in an Ontario Legislature committee yesterday!

Tweet one, by Katie Franzois, who is the much-loved Queen’s Park bureau chief for Newstalk 1010:

What’s it mean? It means “admin passwords” can’t delete emails off the server, that’s what.  And it means what I (and precious few others) told you is the truth: EMAILS AREN’T ON INDIVIDUAL ONTARIO GOVERNMENT COMPUTERS. THEY’RE ON THE FRIGGING SERVER, AND THEY THEREFORE CAN’T BE DELETED BY POLITICAL STAFFERS. Sorry for the shouting, but mass stupidity irritates me.  (Lisa MacLeod’s in particular – no wonder Tim Hudak detests her.)

Here’s Tweet two by the much-admired John Michael McGrath, who writes for Queen’s Park Briefing, a Toronto Star subscription service.

“Um” is right. What’s that mean? It means that this supposed top-secret-code-ring access to the vaunted “admin” level wasn’t all that top secret, was it? It means that granting my friend Pete Faist access wasn’t all that nefarious, at all.  Want proof?

Here’s tweet three, with proof:

That’s a tweet from the much-watched Ashley Rowe, from CTV.  That means Pete got the same “admin rights” that, oh, MORE THAN TEN THOUSAND OTHER PEOPLE HAD (sorry I’m shouting again, but I detest idiocy on this scale, particularly Lisa MacLeod’s).  And, even with that “admin rights” stuff, Pete couldn’t have deleted any fucking emails if he had wanted to.

Which he didn’t.

What’s it all mean, Virginia? It means this:

The “deleted gas plant email scandal” isn’t one.  Because the emails weren’t ever deleted.

Don’t believe me? Read the sworn testimony.  This thing is the biggest load of bullshit since Westmount hobby farmer John Gomery rolled into town.

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Gord, gone

Gord Tulk, who resembles a computer virus, has defamed a person in comments by calling them a member of a terrorist group. I don’t want to get sued for his stupidity, so he’s gone.

Oh, and this web site isn’t anyone’s personal sandbox. Keep that in mind, please and thanks.

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Winning

Despite the sneaky efforts of a lunatic in Ottawa, my amazing lawyers, Brian Shiller and Angela Chaisson, won me another case yesterday.  The defendants learned, the hard way, not to rely on the urgings of lunatics.

Congrats and thanks to Brian and Angela.  They’re pit bulls.

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Why hasn’t Charles Sousa returned this family’s call? Why hasn’t John Baird helped them?

Imagine having four young kids, a professional wife who helps you run a school, and that you do a lot of charity work – raising money for orphanages and whatnot.  Imagine going to work, and then being attacked in your office by a bunch of thugs, and then thrown in the worst prison in the country.  Imagine being denied your heart meds and roughed up and denied even a chance to see your kids.  Imagine not being charged, and sleeping on a concrete floor for months.

This guy is a U of T grad.  The people below are his family.  They’re Canadians.

Why the Hell aren’t the Canadian and Ontario governments doing anything to help them out?


Toronto Life: “Warren Kinsella is basically a more casually dressed Game Of Thrones character”

That’s not very nice, even for Toronto Life. (Although if they think I’m Arya Stark, who I adore, I’m okay with it.)

Anyway, keep blaming me for everything, go ahead.  Knock yourself out.

But keep this in mind: the fans of Rob Ford and John Tory (who are basically the same people, but with different vocabularies and hairstyles) are making a big, big mistake if they think that just one person is behind the criticism of them.

There are many, many, many people who are critical of them.  As they will see in October of this year, big time.

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In Tuesday’s Sun: vive le Canada!

Au revoir, separatists. Don’t let the door hit you on your way out.

OK, OK, we know. We shouldn’t get too cocky about the Parti Quebecois’ decisive loss in Monday night’s Quebec election. The so-called “sovereigntists” have been here before, in 2007, and they came back. Like a stain in the carpet that won’t go away, they’ll return to bedevil Canada, eventually.

But they lost! The separatists lost, and they weren’t supposed to! A month ago, an arrogant, detestable, smirking Pauline Marois called an election, because she (and everyone else) was convinced the PQ was an election away from a majority government. And then, a campaign happened.

Campaigns matter, I always like to say, because they do.

When distilled down to its base elements, a campaign is just a great big job interview. You put on some nice clothes, you get a haircut, and you go out with a CV touting your accomplishments. And at the job interview, you talk about the stuff you think your employer wants to hear.

That’s why the Parti Quebecois lost on a historic scale: they talked about stuff Quebec voters didn’t want to hear. Another referendum? Non, merci. A racist “values charter?” Laisse tomber! The conspiracy to assist a few hundred McGill students vote in the provincial election? Vous etes fou! [Ed. That’s “no thanks,” “drop it!” and “you’re crazy,” in that order, folks. You’re welcome.]

The problem, for Marois and her hapless gang of Canada-wreckers, wasn’t so much that the Liberals’ Philippe Couillard ran a great campaign. He didn’t, really; he oversaw a competent, workman-like campaign. The separatists’ problem was they didn’t talk about the issues important to Quebecers.

To wit: the last Ipsos poll issued before Monday night’s vote. Ipsos is a real, reputable polling firm (unlike that shall-not-be-named bucket shop that gets covered in the media a lot, but also gets things wrong a lot).

“What Quebecers want,” Ipsos wrote, “are bread and butter issues to lead the way. [They want Quebec’s government to] roll up their sleeves and get to work.”

And what the vast majority of Quebecers wanted – nearly 80% of them, like every other Canadian – was a focus on jobs, the economy and health care. A referendum, a values charter and Manchurian Candidate-like McGill students didn’t even make the list. Said Ipsos: “The top four [issues] are creating a better economy and jobs (41%), followed by providing better health care (36%), ensuring debt repayment and balancing the budget (24%) and lowering taxes (23%).”

See that? What Marois and her cabal were talking about incessantly didn’t even make the list. Couillard, on the other hand, was so message track he could talk about the economy and health care in his sleep, and probably did.

A few other things helped, along the way. No idiots in Brockville wiped their feet on Quebec flag. No federalists provided “humiliation” fodder. And the three federal leaders – Messrs. Harper, Mulcair and Trudeau – smartly kept a low profile during the campaign. Way to go, boys.

Campaigns matter. So, too, talking about the things that matter to voters.

Couillard did, Marois didn’t. Voila!

Canada wins!