07.31.2010 11:34 AM

Important query

In Kingston with my Mom and the girls. Mom just observed that I have a “nonchalant” way of walking.

My question: “Is there a chalant way of walking?”

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

13 Comments

  1. allegra fortissima says:

    No. there is only a nonchalant way of walking.

    Qui marche sans adeur, sans zele. Ou qui marche avec mollesse, indolence.

    Mind your hips and shoulders, Warren!

  2. Bob LeDrew says:

    That would be a “lost positive”, similar to “kempt” (unkempt) and “couth”. I love language.

  3. Namesake says:

    It’s a good sign: not only that you’re as healthy & happy as poss. under the circumstances, but also that you’re manifestly _not_ a concern troll. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/nonchalant

    But for a visual of its official Antonyms — intense, jumpy, nervous, unnerved http://www.thefreedictionary.com/nonchalant — applied to walking, how’s about:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/4513804/Goose-stepping-may-have-encouraged-people-to-follow-Nazis.html

    • allegra fortissima says:

      I would definitely be a misfit in that kind of crowd, especially in my Ingledew’s high-heels. And proudly so!

  4. Winston Higgs says:

    Of course there is a “chalant” way of walking and I will give you a timely and excellent example. Nonchalant comes from Old French meaning “without concern” or to disregard…sort of. So obviously, the opposite must be with concern and great care.

    Now the example: See Warren. See Warren’s dog Roxy at the back of the yard furiously digging a hole to China. See Warren walk chalantly to the excavation site while avoiding several expertly placed biological landmines by the aforementioned Roxy. Good Roxy!

    Your Welcome.

    • allegra fortissima says:

      Sir Winston,

      I challenge you! The word “chalant” is non-existent in the French language.

      But Warren could walk “comme un chaland” – similar pronunciation. In this case he’d be either embarrassingly drunk (very unlikely) or he’d shop for an iPhone 4 (which he’ll do sans aucun doute sooner or later).

      Nonchalamment Yours

  5. Aurelia says:

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=chalant

    Same definition as in my very ancient print only OED. Heh

  6. Jan says:

    Condaleeza Rice – walks very chalantly(?). Or is it walks with chalant.

  7. allegra fortissima says:

    Must be a twisted Lehnwort in the English language… do you guys really have to do this to the French? No wonder they say “je me souviens”!

    I guess Roxy barks for the time being “peu m’en chaut, peu m’importe”

  8. George Jefferson anyone? I would consider that quite chalant although it could be a result of the dry cleaning fumes he inhaled.

    Around work the gang members that I see often have a unique walk. Not sure if it is choreographed and intentional or just a case of trying to look tough and imitating the alpha-idiot.

  9. Wannabeapiper says:

    Is that the same as “devil may care”. I won’t know either of them.
    I myself, well, I waddle.

  10. Brian says:

    Fly to the UK and find out!

  11. Moebius says:

    Joe Clark? Very awkward walk.

    While in Kingston, try Woodenhead’s Pizza. Best in the city. Or any city, for that matter.

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