, 04.04.2021 12:45 PM

April 4, MLK

Since I was a kid – since this day in 1972, in fact, when I started writing a daily journal – I have always taken note of April 4, and said to myself:  “April 4.  Dr. King.”

Today, more than half a Century ago, Martin Luther King was murdered by a racist in Memphis.  Dr. King was a giant of a man, the one who – as I wrote in Fight The Rightanticipated the message at the core of the Occupy movement, among other things.  While his message continues to resonate across the decades, racial hatred continues unabated, too.

I was a kid, and my family was living in Dallas when he was assassinated. I remember it; I remember how scared we were, how it seemed like the end of decency, and the start of something terrible. It was, too.

So. It’s April 4, so many years later, and here is some of his most remarkable speech.  Surveying the racists who still crowd the public stage in the U.S., I don’t think we will see the likes of him again.


7 Comments

  1. Kevin says:

    Truly amazing. According to the story (probably apocryphal), that speech was kind of bland and flat until the awesome Mahalia, who was sitting off to the side, shouted “Tell them about the dream…”. So he got inspired, started talking about the dream and ended up soaring. Probably the most memorable speech I’ve ever heard.

    I was in Atlanta a few years ago and had the chance to walk down Auburn St – the MLK Center is at the far end. Kind of emotional for a sentimental guy like me. We talked with a street chap who was more or less camped under the freeway, who walked with us and told us the history of the street. It was once known as the richest street in black urban America, but a lot of it was razed to make way for an improved highway system for the Olympics. As a result, big parts of the neighbourhood are empty lots, residents dispersed, shops boarded. The few blocks at the very end where the Center is located are well-maintained, but the edges of that area are contained by projects. (I think they call it progress.)

  2. Fred from BC says:

    Hey Fred? One more bullshit comment like that and you are gone for good.

  3. Mark D says:

    I respect Dr King and all he accomplished for racial equality through the civil rights movement in the U.S.

    Yet as a Canadian patriot, and a lifelong social and political conservative, I am very uncomfortable pointing the finger at racists or racism in the U.S. when we Canadians have yet to fully acknowledge our history of widespread and enduring racism. Here I am talking mainly in our ongoing attitudes towards Indigenous Canadians. And I say this as a practicing Christian, a Canadian patriot, and a lifelong social and political conservative.

    I believe the harm we inflicted on Indigenous families here in Canada through the Indian Residential School System is at least comparable to that inflicted upon African-American families by slavery in the United States.

    And was American treatment of Martin Luther King that led to his assassination any worse than our treatment of Louie Riel?

    More recently, how about our government’s treatment of the Hon. Puglass from the We Wai Kai Nation? Are we honestly without sin here in Canada?

    • PAMELA LEVY3 says:

      I agree and then you have the video of our PM and ‘black/brown face’! Wonder what Martin Luther King would have said to JT?

  4. Ronald O'Dowd says:

    Pretty much every human being is at least potentially capable of greatness. Dr. King definitely falls into that category. He was among the greatest. But MLK was also a flawed human being, like the rest of us. No surprise there. I prefer to build him up for the immense good he did, rather than revel in the not so good. Same with JFK, RFK and so many others. So, in the final analysis, as good as these men were, none of them were saints, though RFK came closest — meaning yes, they were human beings after all.

    What is really contemptible is human beings who happen to be deeply or incredibly flawed themselves tend to take so much delight in tearing down others, especially icons like MLK. I’m sure at least one name easily comes to mind south of the border. Wouldn’t be surprised at all, were that asshole to burn in hell.

  5. Ronald O'Dowd says:

    Of course, I make an absolute and glaring exception for those people who quite deliberately do all they can to break up private citizen’s marriages and attempt to crater those persons’ businesses. They know who they are — and I’m still gunning for them politically — and with relish. So…hold on to your horses cause you ain’t seen nothing yet. And by the way, with love, FUCK OFF!

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