09.28.2011 06:54 AM

Debate stuff (updated)

Real people don’t watch debates the way journalists or hacks do.  They’re not looking for a “defining moment” or a “knockout punch” – or who got off the best nasty quip or insult.  They dislike politics because of that kind of stuff.  They think there’s too much of it already.

To Joe and Jane Frontporch, a debate is a televised job interview.  In something like last night’s Ontario leaders’ debate, they wanted to see who looked and sounded most like a Premier.

Hudak and Horwath were applying for the jobs they already had – opposition leaders. That left my guy to look and sound like a Premier.  That’s why the only post-debate poll said we won.

More here about what a debate is, and isn’t.

 

9 Comments

  1. Peter says:

    Of course, you are the one who said Ignatieff did ‘just fine.’

  2. anonymous says:

    The numeracy illiteracy across the swath of MSM this morning is astounding. The facts and figures thrown out by all three candidates should be the ‘meat on the bones’, people.

    Again, what and where were the allocation drop off spots of the alleged $20 BILLION over the last decade — allocated without meaning wage job creation??

    Clearly, the ledgers have to be open to the public, for informed choices to be made.

    Talk of hand gesturing, who looks more premierministerial is not the substance of a debate or its clear purpose.

    Economic analysis would be nice. Costing programs and sourcing the money for programs would be even better. Not which ‘nice person’ we’d like to share a beer with.

    For instance, McGuinty claimed 16,000 green jobs are involved in the wind turbine and solar panel business. A job registry could go on line with classifications and job holders discussing wage scales??

    The green business both in California and Spain is largely responsible for bringing both those economies to their knees. Resulting in bankruptcy and be clear that’s where Dalton is going with that one. The fact that he indicated Hudak could ‘cancel the contract” is good news, or should be to every Ontarion AND Canadian for that matter.

    Here’s a concept which should be pursued and it involves the banking and real estate sector. A thirty percent reduction in mortgage and rental rates adopted by popular demand would kickstart confidence in purchasing thereby infusing stalled economies.

    Jobsharing in the 21st century was predicted at the upstart of computer technology. Its time has come. Whereby jobs are shared by two, three day work weeks for each ‘sharer’ would boost family, leisure life. Result a healthier population able to produce to the max in their respective fields.

    Thank you, Mr. Kinsella for the forum for expression regarding our provincial economy and its one time opportunity to go forward, not backward.

    note to James Bow, if you have a problem with ‘anonymous’ recognize ‘moron’ as one poster here cited. He could be right, he/she could be wrong, but that’s neither here nor there.

    Kudos to Ms. Horwath, a politician to watch pending her party’s readjustments to be made on the foreign policy file.

  3. anonymous says:

    Check out the Abacus data regional polling results. Vastly in conflict with Ipsos Reid. Until the numbers put out in last night’s debate, the conversation is quite meaningless.

    Also, the Liberal staging of the energy plant’s photo-op was as phoney as a three dollar bill. The condos buildings were up way prior to the selected site in Oakville, Mississauga. The reported cost of relocating the facility is in the vicinity of another BILLION DOLLARS. That’s hardly cool or efficient fiscal management. I guess only TRILLION DOLLAR bloopers will catch voters’ attention, eh??

  4. anonymous says:

    That should read, “until the numbers put out in last night’s debate are CRUNCHED, the conversation is quite meaningless..” The media perhaps are intentionally indolent on that initiative and/or suffer from basic numeracy illiteracy.

  5. TheSilentObserver says:

    I didn’t thing Mcguinty came off that strong myself. He’s my preference out of the three, and he needs all the support he can get to prevent Hudak from capturing the province, but he didn’t inspire. This debate reminded me why people are fed up with him and the record he has behind him, but Hudak being Hudak is still more unpopular than Mcguinty’s long, sometimes bumpy record. I call Liberal minority, this debate has reinforced this if anything.

  6. Woody says:

    Warren, any links to a podcast I can d/l of the debate? I missed it for the most part and want to listen. I know CBC has is streaming but I want to play it on my iPod.

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