“Warren Kinsella's book, ‘Fight the Right: A Manual for Surviving the Coming Conservative Apocalypse,’ is of vital importance for American conservatives and other right-leaning individuals to read, learn and understand.”

- The Washington Times

“One of the best books of the year.”

- The Hill Times

“Justin Trudeau’s speech followed Mr. Kinsella’s playbook on beating conservatives chapter and verse...[He followed] the central theme of the Kinsella narrative: “Take back values. That’s what progressives need to do.”

- National Post

“[Kinsella] is a master when it comes to spinning and political planning...”

- George Stroumboulopoulos, CBC TV

“Kinsella pulls no punches in Fight The Right...Fight the Right accomplishes what it sets out to do – provide readers with a glimpse into the kinds of strategies that have made Conservatives successful and lay out a credible roadmap for progressive forces to regain power.”

- Elizabeth Thompson, iPolitics

“[Kinsella] deserves credit for writing this book, period... he is absolutely on the money...[Fight The Right] is well worth picking up.”

- Huffington Post

“Run, don't walk, to get this amazing book.”

- Mike Duncan, Classical 96 radio

“Fight the Right is very interesting and - for conservatives - very provocative.”

- Former Ontario Conservative leader John Tory

“His new book is great! All of his books are great!”

- Tommy Schnurmacher, CJAD

“I absolutely recommend this book.”

- Paul Wells, Maclean’s

“Kinsella puts the Left on the right track with new book!”

- Calgary Herald


The NDP won’t fire the candidate who made the comment about Nazis

How come? He’s in an unwinnable riding. Is it because others in the NDP feel similarly?



16 Responses to “The NDP won’t fire the candidate who made the comment about Nazis”

  1. yes, Warren. It’s because the NDP are all anti-Semites and secret Fourth-Reich activists. You’re smearing a good human being. I’m learning a lot about how politics works this week. And none of it is good.

    • Warren says:

      What he said is a disgrace. And you’re just as bad if you can’t see that.

      • Let’s put the ‘disgrace’ out there, shall we?

        “For some people, the politics of Nazi Germany might be their religion. Just as I can’t condemn other people’s religion – I don’t agree with them! But, you can’t stop somebody from believing something. If you bash your head against the wall trying, it’s not their fault, it’s your fault. You’re the one who’s pretty messed up if you’re going to devote your entire life to trying to convince somebody not to believe what they believe.”

        He’s not condoning the beliefs of Nazis or agreeing with them. He’s saying it’s impossible and futile to CHANGE those beliefs. Do you think you, me, or anyone else could change Wolfgang Droege’s mind for him? Do you think that Rockwell or Zundel or the other lunatics who believe their patent nonsense could be fazed by someone trying to argue them out of being white-pride maniacs? I don’t. And I’m shocked that the person who wrote Web of Hate either doesn’t recognize that fanaticism doesn’t respond to logic, or would rather play partisan politics than focus on logical discourse.

        Not that it matters, but I’ve lost a great deal of respect for you over this.

        Ironically enough, the CAPTCHA for this comment is BSDM. I’m not sure whether it’s a reference to the fact that someone joining the political fray is a masochist, or if this is a BS issue. Maybe both.

        • Warren says:

          Then beat it.

          He not only defended the “religion” of Naziism, he mocked those who have devoted their lives to opposing Naziism.

          And, when Horwath was questioned about it just now by the media, she refused to discipline Marco, and said that he had been taken out of context.

          Here is his full statement, in context:

          “Don’t tell me that there’s a separation of church and state right now, because when people talk about the religious right, there’s two words that just married church and state pretty f***in’ quick didn’t they? And if you’re going to talk about a book burning, may I suggest that over the next little while, if you’re going to burn books, and for the most part I would never advocate burning books, because you know books are, when I read a book, even as bad as the book is, I’m that type of person that doesn’t throw books away, I’ve got books all over the place. Maybe someday I should throw books away, but I don’t throw them away. But there are a couple of ones that I would suggest burning. And you know what, it’s not even from an ideological perspective, like ‘oh well, burn stuff by Adolf Hitler,” no. Whatever. If you want to read that stuff, read that stuff. For some people the old politics of Nazi Germany might be their religion. And just as I can’t condemn other people’s religion, I can’t, I don’t agree with them, but you can’t stop somebody from believing in something. And to bash your head against the wall trying, it’s not their fault, it’s your fault. You’re the one who is pretty messed up if you’re going to devote your entire life to trying to convince somebody not to believe what they believe. So if you’re going to be burning books over the next little while, I suggest not burning books for a while…”

          Get that? The leader of the Ontario NDP considers that to be a rational and effective rebuttal. All I see is more idiocy – and a paean to Mein Kampf, as well.

          Bob, if you don’t understand why that’s all problematic, you never will. Go away and don’t come back.

        • kyle says:

          It should be pretty damn easy to condemn Nazism! And the more people who condemn hateful belief systems, the better. Standing firm against white supremacy may not win converts amongst irredeemable zealots, but it certainly signals to others that you’re taking a stand against hate.

          No, he’s not condoning the beliefs of Nazis, he’s just lambasting those who devote their lives to fighting racial hatred? Um, I gotta think there are far better targets for his ire.

          Engaging in rhetorical exercises like these isn’t brave and it certainly doesn’t show good judgment for someone who wants to represent the people of Ontario in the House of Commons.

  2. billg says:

    We had an NDP candidate call the Taliban “insurgents” during the last election, and, a few weeks ago NDP Leader Ms Turmel said that the world changed when “4 rogue planes” crashed into the World Trade Centre towers. And now this little gem from Marco. Problem is, the MSM dont really take the NDP seriously because, well, they’re hard to take seriously.

  3. DL says:

    I’m not sure what your point is. The definition of the word “insurgent” is as follows: “Rising in revolt against established authority, especially a government.” – isn’t that what Taliban is doing vis a vis the Afghan gov’t?

  4. smelter rat says:

    Mostly I just get that the guy is an idiot who can’t put his thoughts together in a very articulate way.

    • kyle says:

      Think you nailed it. I mean, mostly, and I know some idiots, we all do, which is to say that yes, thoughts are important and yes, and expressing them can be, I mean, you may have trouble articulating your thoughts or presenting them in a way that…but whatever, take Hitler. Or don’t. Because…

  5. scot says:

    Hard to believe how clueless the dippers seem when you take a close look.

  6. billg says:

    Your right DL, the stoning of women in large stadiums for years was a way to revolt against the govt, murdering mothers of young girls because they educated them was just a simple protest, and of course, using the threat of torture or death to impliment a bizarre religious cult on their fellow citizens is just the way it is in some countrys. And such is the problem with the NDP, to most of them the Taliban are insurgents, misunderstood rebels who have killed and tortured women and children for a nobel cause. And now, a Nazi is a person with a misguided religious belief, and, we shouldnt bother getting our backs up over it, because, sigh, they’re gonna do what they’re gonna do.
    Whats next from the NDP…demanding more HOC seats for Quebec even though its population is in decline?……plain gooooofy.

  7. DL says:

    “Insurgent” is just the accepted term for any group trying to violently overthrow a government. It can be good or evil. Back in the 70s when the Khmer Rouge was fighting a civil war to overthrow the government in Cambodia – the US government and media routinely referred to them as “insurgents” – it didn’t mean they were any less repulsed by what they stood for.

  8. allegra fortissima says:

    Excerpt from the Noble Peace Price Acceptance Speech delivered by Elie Wiesel in Oslo on December 10, 1986:

    “I remember it happened yesterday, or eternities ago. A young Jewish boy discovered the Kingdom of Night. I remember his bewilderment, I remember his anguish. It all happened so fast. The ghetto. The deportation. The sealed cattle car. The fiery altar upon which the history of our people and the future of mankind were meant to be sacrificed.
    I remember he asked his father, ‘Can this be true? This is the twentieth century, not the Middle Ages. Who would allow such crimes to be committed? How could the world remain silent?’
    And now the boy is turning to me. ‘Tell me,’ he asks. ‘What have you done with my future, what have you done with your life?’ And I tell him that I have tried. That I have tried to keep memory alive, that I have tried to fight those who would forget. Because if we forget, we are guilty, we are accomplices.
    And then I explain to him how naive we were, that the world did know and remained silent. And that is why I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”

  9. Chris says:

    You know, if he’d run for the NDP in Quebec in May, he would likely now be an M.P.

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