“Warren Kinsella's book, ‘Fight the Right: A Manual for Surviving the Coming Conservative Apocalypse,’ is of vital importance for American conservatives and other right-leaning individuals to read, learn and understand.”

- The Washington Times

“One of the best books of the year.”

- The Hill Times

“Justin Trudeau’s speech followed Mr. Kinsella’s playbook on beating conservatives chapter and verse...[He followed] the central theme of the Kinsella narrative: “Take back values. That’s what progressives need to do.”

- National Post

“[Kinsella] is a master when it comes to spinning and political planning...”

- George Stroumboulopoulos, CBC TV

“Kinsella pulls no punches in Fight The Right...Fight the Right accomplishes what it sets out to do – provide readers with a glimpse into the kinds of strategies that have made Conservatives successful and lay out a credible roadmap for progressive forces to regain power.”

- Elizabeth Thompson, iPolitics

“[Kinsella] deserves credit for writing this book, period... he is absolutely on the money...[Fight The Right] is well worth picking up.”

- Huffington Post

“Run, don't walk, to get this amazing book.”

- Mike Duncan, Classical 96 radio

“Fight the Right is very interesting and - for conservatives - very provocative.”

- Former Ontario Conservative leader John Tory

“His new book is great! All of his books are great!”

- Tommy Schnurmacher, CJAD

“I absolutely recommend this book.”

- Paul Wells, Maclean’s

“Kinsella puts the Left on the right track with new book!”

- Calgary Herald


Under the Gardiner now

…stopped.

If some big pile of concrete lands on me, it’s been a slice. Vote Liberal, etc.



13 Responses to “Under the Gardiner now”

  1. JamesHalifax says:

    That expressway is nothing but an eyesore….

    Could they have made it any more ugly?

  2. Kelly says:

    This stuff is what happens after 20 years of selfish tax cut propaganda. We choose to spend too much money on private consumption rather than public goods — our society spends more on ever bigger TVs, 3 car garages, Jetskis and JLo CDs instead of keeping up with infrastructure, enough doctors trained (we rank Waaaaaay down the list on per capital physicians in the OECD — France has twice as many, hence virtually no waiting lists), etc.

    Private wealth and public squalor — Galbraith summed it up nicely. He also used the horse and sparrow analogy — the horses get the oats and all the little sparrows eat what’s left coming out the other end. So much more illustrative than the trickle down theory.

    • Greg from Calgary says:

      Now those are some good points! Don’t know if I agree with them 100% but nonetheless excellent post.

  3. Tom says:

    But you’re driving in the safest city in the world. According to Jaba the Mayor.

  4. T.W says:

    Nothing that a wrecking ball can’t cure.
    The Gardiner Expressway is a reminder of how stupid traffic design was 50 years ago.
    It’s a blight on the landscape, knock it down and start digging.

  5. Dude Love says:

    Hopefully you won’t need to be airlifted to a hospital.

  6. JamesHalifax says:

    Yes Terry….it’s all Harper’s fault the city of Toronto can’t look after its own roads. After all….Harper is from Toronto.

    • Philip says:

      James, which levels of government take care of infrastructure funding?

      • Jason Hickman says:

        Don’t cities get most of their funding from the provincial government, not the federal? And therefore, isn’t the province on the hook when things go wrong at the municipal level? After all, that was certainly the line I heard when the Ontario PCs were in power provincially and the Liberals were in power federally, back in the late 90s…

        (In fact, it’s more complicated then that, regardless of which Premier or PM is in office from whatever party. I’m just interested to see that Terence and Philip didn’t mention Queen’s Park.)

        • Philip says:

          Well, I did ask the question because I wasn’t entirely sure about how the responsibilities were divided up between federal and provincial levels. I am pretty sure that the ability of a municipality is limited to property taxes and bond issues. Toronto and other large Canadian cities can’t fund medium to large infrastructure projects by themselves.

          Large Canadian cities do need a new status in Canada. Some have infrastructure dating back 100 years or more, all of them are expanding in both size and population. Large cities are where opportunities are being created and a lot wealth is being created in Canada. Now is the time to grow support for cities, provincial and federal, not cut back.

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