01.17.2014 11:38 AM

Raptors come out for Olivia Chow for mayor!

Well, not really.  And she’s not a candidate, as far as I am aware, so I guess that should be kept in mind, too.

Anyway, I’m a Raptors fan, and a Chow fan, as well – so forgive my enthusiasm. So, too, is former Raps boss Peddie.  Full column here:

Looking around Toronto today, where is the leader who will champion our city? I asked this before, in a speech weeks before the last municipal election. I lamented then that we lacked candidates with leadership skills like personal values, big ideas and the edge to make the right decisions well.

I lament now that we ended up with Rob Ford and think four years is enough. Because I realized that adding bricks doesn’t only apply to companies. It applies to people, too. And we deserve better than a mayor who measures success by what he opposes and who he attacks.

In my book, I also wrote that I wanted to get involved in the 2014 election. Not as a candidate but as a citizen. So I started to ask people I respect about who they respect, and unexpectedly, kept returning to one candidate.

I had met Olivia Chow here and there over the years. She isn’t much of a sports fan and I wasn’t at NDP meetings. But over tea one afternoon, we had an engaging discussion about Toronto’s future. I came away somewhat impressed and more than a little surprised.

Impressed because of all levels of government, municipal needs to understand bricks best. Not just the bricks of infrastructure that keeps us stuck in long commutes away from family, or businesses unable to create jobs. But also the bricks of neighbourhoods and how services, parks and libraries – you know, gravy – do what MLSE’s courts and rinks do: strategically invest in long-term help for people.

Surprised because she challenged my perceptions about who she was. A product of an immigrant family that supported itself through working in a hotel laundry. And despite the partisan news coverage from Ottawa, someone who will find common values and help us build something better together.

The mark of a good mayor isn’t calling himself the best mayor ever. Instead, it’s having the experience to know that liveable neighbourhoods and prosperity flow from strategically investing. Not throwing money at tactical things, but making that money really work.

Whether she will run for mayor I don’t know. Obviously she is considering it. I certainly encouraged her to and happily offered my support. Because I am convinced that on the big picture, she gets where Toronto needs to go.

 

5 Comments

  1. Jon Powers says:

    A glowing endorsement by one of the most despised men in Toronto!

  2. Matt says:

    I’m not sure an endorsement from the guy that was in charge of MLSE during the most pathetic run of futility for the Leafs, Raptors and TFC will have the positive affect you’re hoping for.

    It MIGHT even have the opposite affect. It strengthens Ford’s supporters mantra about the elites.

  3. Matt says:

    Quote Peddie:

    “…..you know, gravy – do what MLSE’s courts and rinks do: strategically invest in long-term help for people.”

    Psssst, Richard – Taxpayers paid to build BMO Field for TFC AND the Mastercard Centre where the Leafs practise.

    Plus your former organization, worth an estimated$2.5 Billion, just took $500,000 taxpayer dollars from the Ontario government to get the 2016 NBA all-star game.

  4. Ian Howard says:

    Forget the endorsements.
    Richard Peddie is good for raising money and destroying sports teams.

  5. L. Adams says:

    Olivia Chow is a fine MP but she is yesterday’s woman if she runs for mayor of TO. Personally, I think Olivia will pass on the mayoralty race because it’s just a headache for somebody who should be planning her retirement from public life. She deserves some quiet honour and dignity and she won’t find it as mayor of TO.

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